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2005 Year Summary

2005 Year Summary
 
 

SPECIES ( )
RIARC Number Vote (Accepted-Not Accepted-Natural Status Uncertain): # of birds reported; location; date(s); reporters (I = initial observer, R = report submitted, P = photograph submitted).

 

JANUARY


FEBRUARY

 

MARCH

 

APRIL 


MAY

WHITE-FACED IBIS (Plegadis chihi)
2005-2 (7-0): One; Jamestown; 2-3 May 2005; John McGill (I,R).

John Magill located this White-faced Ibis in a flock of about 250 Glossy Ibis in the fields north of Weeden Lane in Jamestown.  The birds flew to the south side of the road, and then down to Marsh Meadows.  John followed the bird, and had pretty good looks at it for about an hour.  The next day John went back and relocated the bird north of Weeden Lane.  This time John was able to clearly make out the red facial skin and red iris.  


JUNE

https://sites.google.com/a/ri-avianrecords.org/www/Home/yearly-summaries/2005-year-summary/SEWR-AC.JPG

SEDGE WREN (Cistothorus platensis) nest
2005-1 (7-0): Three +, Breeding; Newport County; 25 Jun thru 22 Aug 2005; Rachel Farrell (I,R), Robert Emerson (R), Geoff Dennis (P).

Rachel Farrell heard two Sedge Wrens calling in a field on private property.  The vocalizations indicated that there may be nesting in the area.  Geoff Dennis was able to get photographs to confirm the presence of the birds.  Furthermore, one of the Sedge Wrens, presumably a female, was observed repeatedly carrying food to the base of a clump of grass.  These observations provided evidence of nesting.



JULY


AUGUST

  

SEPTEMBER

 

OCTOBER

 

NOVEMBER

SELASPHORUS SP.
2005-4 (6-0): One; Warwick Neck, Warwick; 1 Nov 2005 through 17 Jan 2006; Henry Coupe, (I), Geoff Dennis (P).

https://sites.google.com/a/ri-avianrecords.org/www/Home/yearly-summaries/2005-year-summary/selas-BU-WN-06.JPG
https://sites.google.com/a/ri-avianrecords.org/www/Home/yearly-summaries/2005-year-summary/selas-BQ-WN-06.JPG


Henry Coupe, a homeowner on Warwick Neck, observed this hummingbird coming to his feeders on 1 Nov 2005.
  Geoff Dennis went to photograph the bird on 15 January 2006.  By that time the homeowner’s son was rotating feeders several times a day because the outside feeder was slushing up.  The photos taken by Geoff were not sufficient to identify this bird as to species.  A return trip for photographs was not possible because the bird was last seen on 17 January.




RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD (Selasphorus rufus)
2005-5 (7-0): One; West Warwick; 20 Nov 2005 through 20 Apr 2006; Carol Simas (I), Geoff Dennis (P).

https://sites.google.com/a/ri-avianrecords.org/www/Home/yearly-summaries/2005-year-summary/2005-5%20%20Rufous%20Hummingbird%20%20comparison%20GD%20%C2%A9.jpg
https://sites.google.com/a/ri-avianrecords.org/www/Home/yearly-summaries/2005-year-summary/selas-BE-WW-05_06.JPG
Carol Simas reported this Rufous Hummingbird coming to the feeders on November 20, 2005.  The bird stayed through the cold winter months.  During that time the feeders were warmed by a 150 Watt light bulb a few inches from the feeder.  In the extremely cold part of the winter, a 500 Watt bulb was used.  Geoff Dennis was able to photograph the bird several times.
  Remarkably, this bird is the first hummingbird known to have overwintered in Rhode Island, and was last seen on 20 April 2006.  
Geoff put together two photos of the bird from November and April.  These photos show the molting of the gorget over that period of time.


DECEMBER

REDWING (Turdus iliacus)
2005-3 (7-0): One; Wakefield, South Kingstown; 26 Dec 2005; Christian Nunes (I,R).

At about 8:45 AM during the South Kingstown Christmas Bird Count, Christian Nunes was birding in a wooded area on Old Mountain Field Road.  He was observing several robins in the area when he heard an unusual bird above him that sounded somewhat like a European Starling.  When Christian looked up with his binoculars he immediately knew that the bird on the Oak branch above him was a Redwing.  Over the next ten minutes Christian observed the bird at fairly close range, and heard the bird singing many times.  He recorded details of both the appearance of the bird and the song.  His detailed written report and sketch provided documentation for this first state record of Redwing in Rhode Island.  The next day several birders scoured the area, but there were no additional confirmed reports after the original sighting.